Brown Bag: Cautious travel: On quarantines, biosecurity, and post-pandemic tourism mobilities

‘Hotel quarantine’ has become commonplace throughout the world in order to mitigate against long incubation periods of Sars-CoV-2. In Denmark, the scale of hotel quarantine is easing, restricted only to travellers from ‘high-risk’ nations. Yet countries with ‘hard’ border closures, such as Australia, Aotearoa–New Zealand, and Hong Kong, still have stringent user-pay hotel quarantine that places all returning citizens into minimum 14-days of ‘mandatory detention’. With tourism, flight routes and ‘bubbles’ cautiously reopening, tourists need to prepare—physically, materially, and mentally—for the chance of getting stuck in hotel quarantine. While tourism, mobilities, and migration scholars have studied the geopolitical and logistical challenges (and flaws) on restricting mobile bodies in mandatory quarantine facilities, there have been few empirical or conceptual studies on how people prepare for and experience these periods. In this paper, we outline the future of tourism mobilities in a post-pandemic era, by discussing how new ‘cautious’ travel mindsets are formed by risk avoidance, personal expectations and the preparedness for quarantine and biosecurity restrictions. We entertain notions of the material, embodied, sensory, and mundane mobilities that people are likely to be confronted with during their quarantine time. Drawing on insights from preliminary work in Australia, we explore how the revival of tourism will need to prepare for lengthy disruptions, detentions, and delays of quarantines that operate as control mechanisms within an increasingly biopolitical global mobility system.

Time

24.11.2021 kl. 12.00 - 13.00

Description

Cautious travel: On quarantines, biosecurity, and post-pandemic tourism mobilities

Speakers:
Kaya Barry and Martin Trandberg Jensen, Department of Culture and Learning, kayatb@hum.aau.dk / trandberg@hum.aau.dk

Abstract:
‘Hotel quarantine’ has become commonplace throughout the world in order to mitigate against long incubation periods of Sars-CoV-2. In Denmark, the scale of hotel quarantine is easing, restricted only to travellers from ‘high-risk’ nations. Yet countries with ‘hard’ border closures, such as Australia, Aotearoa–New Zealand, and Hong Kong, still have stringent user-pay hotel quarantine that places all returning citizens into minimum 14-days of ‘mandatory detention’. With tourism, flight routes and ‘bubbles’ cautiously reopening, tourists need to prepare—physically, materially, and mentally—for the chance of getting stuck in hotel quarantine. While tourism, mobilities, and migration scholars have studied the geopolitical and logistical challenges (and flaws) on restricting mobile bodies in mandatory quarantine facilities, there have been few empirical or conceptual studies on how people prepare for and experience these periods. In this paper, we outline the future of tourism mobilities in a post-pandemic era, by discussing how new ‘cautious’ travel mindsets are formed by risk avoidance, personal expectations and the preparedness for quarantine and biosecurity restrictions. We entertain notions of the material, embodied, sensory, and mundane mobilities that people are likely to be confronted with during their quarantine time. Drawing on insights from preliminary work in Australia, we explore how the revival of tourism will need to prepare for lengthy disruptions, detentions, and delays of quarantines that operate as control mechanisms within an increasingly biopolitical global mobility system.

Place and time:
Rendsburggade 14, C-MUS Lab (room 5.355a) + MS Teams, November 24, 12:00-13:00

Unless anything else is marked, all seminars are held at the C-MUS Lab (Rendsburggade 14, room 5.355a) as well as there is a MS Teams link option.

The seminars are open to everyone with interest in Mobilities and Urban studies.
Pre-registration is not needed. Please bring you own lunch.

Looking forward to see you at the C-MUS Brown Bag Seminars!

 

Host

C-MUS

Address

AAU, Rendsburggade 14, C-MUS Lab (room 5.355a), 9000 Aalborg

Events